Books and Catalogues

Excerpted essay from "The Tides of Provincetown" exhibition and catalog at The New Britain Museum of American Art.

"Ranalli not only captures the timeless, elemental movements of the sea, but he also documents how random human interaction with these forces disrupts natural cycles. By collaborating with nature, Ranalli produces a contemporary and personal yet environmental reaction to the beauty of the Cape that is completely original. His interest in natural history and concern for the future raises the awareness of new ways to find inspiration in a landscape that has been reproduced thousands of times as well as the need to protect that very source."
Alexander Noelle, Curator
"Traces: Daniel Ranalli, Cape Work 1987-2007",
Provincetown Art Association and Museum Exhibition Catalog Essay by Leslie K. Brown

Available from the artist $10. postpaid
Articles and Reviews

Bibliography Section Article
"I much preferred Daniel Ranalli's wonderful diptych of a bunch of snails set up in a spiral (a miniaturized, art-world joke at the expense of Robert Smithson's monumental Spiral Jetty and the whole Earthworks crowd) who, in the next frame, have scattered, leaving ridges behind them to proclaim their paths to freedom."

Debra Cash, Dance/Draw at the ICA
Arts Fuse
October 13, 2011

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"Check out, in particular, Janine Antoni's exquisite "Butterfly Kisses, " made by blinking her mascara-coated eyelashes against paper (a kind of dance flirtation, strenuously committed to paper) and Ranalli's "Snail Drawings"- before-and-after photos of snails wandering out of the configurations in which he has placed them."

Sebastian Smee, Dance/Draw at the ICA
The Boston Globe
October 9, 2011

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“Closely tied to nature’s wonders, both its regular rhythms and its constant change, Ranalli’s work sensitizes the viewer to the daily spectacles of sea meeting land. His work straddles the boundary between abstraction and realism. The forms he constructs are geometric and abstract, yet they are set with real materials on nature’s stage.”

Deborah Forman
Art New England, Ranalli’s Whims of Nature
January/February 2011

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“Daniel Ranalli’s work is like performance art, but without an audience. … the inspiration for much of his work comes from nature…which he frequently arranges into patterns and forms. Much of his work is reclaimed by the sea or altered by weather, and it is that transience, that shape-shifting that marks his work. The result is ethereal."

Kimberly Cornuelle
BU Today, Capturing the Ephemeral
November 17, 2010

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"There's science in Ranalli's art as well—the science of instruction, of one kind of teacher recognizing the artistry of his colleagues, no matter what the field. Ranalli has altered his photos with computer software to create these collages, giving a semblance of order and elegance to a readymade world of otherwise unrelated imagery."

Shawn Hill
Art New England, Daniel Ranalli: Chalkboards
June-July 2009

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"[Ranalli's] chalkboards reveal more information than I could have imagined. Erasures evoke the marks of a paintbrush. Bits of scrawl chatter and squirm. Complete words or equations grab attention like magnets. Then there's the surprising element of color - who knew there were so many shades of green and gray? Ranalli has even altered one to look gold. In all, these works consider space, mark-making, and color in a distinctly painterly manner."

Cate McQuaid
The Boston Globe, A Radiant 'Renaissance':
Exhibit Stresses Pure Form and Color
March 11, 2009

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Bibliography Section Article
"The achingly vivid color photos capture a moment of perfect harmony that a breeze will sweep away."

Cate McQuaid
The Boston Globe, Arts Gallery Pick
August 2006

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"The works of Dan Ranalli... despite their imposed order and structure, ultimately transmit the absolute truth: Everything changes, moment to moment."

Marina Veronica
artsMEDIA, Natural Obsession
July 2005

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"Although he continues to seek to uncover the relationships between humans and nature, found and altered landscapes, and the effects of chaos on momentarily imposed order, [Ranalli's] works are infused with peace and tranquility."

Leon Nigrosh
artsMEDIA, A Mystic's Art
November 2003

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"Minimally rearranging materials he encounters on his walks through this volatile landscape, Ranalli creates a push-pull with nature as he then watches his manipulations succumb to the relentless forces of change."

Elli Crocker
Curator's Statement, Daniel Ranalli | Asian Work
September-November 2003

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"'Zen Dune Garden' is the gentlest work by this artist that I've seen, showing man's footprint on the earth as a collaboration with nature, not nature's enemy."

Cate McQuaid
The Boston Globe, Meditating on Eastern Disciplines
in Provincetown
August 15, 2003

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"As it is, they compliment each other. Where Ranalli is edgy and provocative, Vevers is reflective and deep. And each knows what is to have a passion for making things that express the subtle, fleeting dilemmas that grace a human soul."

Cate McQuaid
The Boston Globe, A Creative Pairing On and Off Cape
August 12, 1999

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"Ranalli particularly interweaves sensibilities culled from a simultaneously rising consciousness of other cultures. His sensitive, ephemeral work integrates bits of the British 'walkers' Richard Long and Amish Fulton, the British artist Andy Goldsworthy's delicate site constructions, native American reverence for natural objects, Zen-like collaborations with natural forces, and John Cage's riffs on randomness. Underlying these elements is a solid appreciation for accessible formal constructs, still the portal through which most viewers most readily pass."

Ann Wilson Lloyd
Exhibition Catalog Essay, Daniel Ranalli: Projects + Photographs
December 1993

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"On the formal level, Ranalli acts like a 19th-century gentleman scientist, arranging materials, photographing them in straightforward style, mostly in black and white, and writing labels for them with his own hand. In content, though, the work is poetic, elegiac."

Christine Temin
The Boston Globe, Mingling Scientific Detachment and
Personal Passion
December 7, 1989

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Bibliography Section Article
"Ranalli's objective is akin to the credo of the 1950s abstract expressionist painters: effecting a spiritual rejuvenation in the beholder of the art."

Gerald Perry
Boston Magazine, Boston Photography
December 1983

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