This section contains both vintage photograms from 1974-1984 and recent reconstructions using scans of some of those pieces.

Photograms-Vintage & New
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage, split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
Figure #11
1982
Photogram, Vintage, split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
20"x16"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything. I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings, the Chalkboards or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage, split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
Triad Division
1980
Photogram, Vintage, split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
16"x20"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything. I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings, the Chalkboards or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage, split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
Horizontal Division #3
1979
Photogram, Vintage, split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
16"x20"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything. I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings, the Chalkboards or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
Curved Division #2
1980
Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
16"x20"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings, the Chalkboards or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
Dancing Lines #2
1982
Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
20"x16"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
Light Opening #2
1982
Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
Dividing Line
1980
Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
16"x20"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
"Horizontal Opening #2"
1979
Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
16"x20"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything. I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
Riama #2
1983
Photogram, Vintage split-toned gelatin silver print, unique
20"x16"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
Photogram #19
1979/2017
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned. With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series: Skylines 11
2018/19
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; Circle #7
2017
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "Opening Lines #5"
2018
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, split-toned GSP, unique
Hanging Lines #2
1982
Photogram, split-toned GSP, unique

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, split-toned GSP, unique
Verila
1983
Photogram, split-toned GSP, unique
16"x20"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, split-toned GSP, unique
Luminous Curves
1981
Photogram, split-toned GSP, unique
20"x16"

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "New Horizon #4"
2018/19
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "Flame #2 N"
2017
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "New Horizon #2"
2018
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Photogram, Archival Inkjet print from paper negative
Flame #1
1978-1984
Photogram, Archival Inkjet print from paper negative
16"x20" and 23"x30" (editioned)

In technical terms, the photogram is one of the simplest and most elemental forms of photography. It uses no camera, no negative and therefore each “print” is unique. Typically one places objects on sensitized photographic paper in the darkroom - a light source is then turned on for a few seconds - flashing the uncovered paper. The sheet of photographic paper is developed in the conventional manner and the paper turns dark where it has been exposed, leaving ghostly, white, life-sized images of the objects that were placed on it. It is all a bit like drawing with invisible ink - nothing you are doing reveals itself until the sheet of paper is developed - at which point it is too late to change anything.

I made my first photograms in 1974 and was drawn to their enormous potential for abstraction, as well as their rich tonal scale. What I really hoped to do in the work was to make photographs that were not always referencing something outside themselves. I also wanted to make works that looked like they were fabricated with light which is the very genesis of the word photography - photo meaning light and graphy meaning writing. I was also intrigued by the somewhat unpredictable nature of the process. No matter how carefully I prepared the architecture of the piece, the final result always had some element of surprise. Nearly all the work I have done since has embraced chance as an aspect of the work - whether in the Snail Drawings or the Tidal Plain Sites - I am never in total control as to what actually takes place, and what I document.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "Light Layers #18"
2018
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "Hazy Lines #2"
2018
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "Diagonal #2 N"
2018/19
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "Dropped Line"
2018
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.
Daniel Ranalli  Photograms-Vintage & New Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
New Photograms Series; "Horizon #8"
2018
Enlarged Photogram, archival pigment print.
40"x50" (edition 5); 24"x30" (edition 5)

For about ten years (1974-84) I worked almost exclusively with the photogram - many examples from that period are on this website. These were unique abstract images that sought to eliminate recognizable subject matter. The prints were mostly 16”x20” and split toned.
With the advent of the digital technology I have made high definition scans of some of the original prints and recombined them to make entirely new images.